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Chocolate Copter

Dear friends,

Although only five months young, dronologista blog has grown and needs a new attire.

As of 1st of September, dronologista.com moves to a new hosting, new address and slightly changes the appearance . Content will remain the same, and dronologista will continue to provide information about non-military drones only.

Enjoy!

This post is about amazing and tasty combination of cooking and engineering skills. It shows that all you need to have to build a quite unique quadcopter is an edible idea and following ingredients:

  • 1000g dark chocolate
  • 100g white chocolate
  • 1x Naza M V2
  • 4x Sunnysky X2216
  • 4x Turnigy Plush 25A ESC

Then you just follow this video, and you will have a drone that you can eat once you’ve done flying.

Check Chocolate Copter Youtube Channel for more

Bon Appétit!

Update:

Here is the first hand story on how it all began, and how the Chococopter was made, courtesy of one of the team members, Michael:

“My girlfriend loves baking and chocolate and I love building and flying quadcopters. That probably makes us the perfect couple fulfilling all gender specific clichés 😉 Anyway, she came up with the idea to build a chocolate copter. I was skeptical at first.

Chocolate is not as stable as aluminum or carbon – which are typically used for copter frames. Nor is it heat-resistant. As we all know from chocolate consumption, it already starts melting at body temperature. The battery, ESCs and motors, however, get rather hot while flying. So chocolate and copters definitely don’t sound like the best combination, but you never know until you try!

First we made a silicone mold from a wooden prototype. The motors and the flight controller were mounted on extended steel spacers. ESCs and the battery were taped to Styrofoam spacers. This prevents the chocolate from direct contact with the hot components and helps increase the life expectancy of the copter. The spacers of the motors were placed in position before the mold was filled with delicious, molten chocolate – this was probably the easiest way to attach the motors to the frame. After spending some hours in the fridge the frame was set and ready for the maiden flight. Needless to say the landing gear was made out of chocolate as well.

And it worked! It flew as stable and smooth as any other copter. So we have found a new way of building copters, without the need for drilling, milling or cutting! And best of all, when you get hungry during the flight sessions you always have something to nibble with you ;-)”

And since it was so much fun building it we are already working on another totally crazy copter”

 

Thank you Michael!

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Drone Startups part 5: Gofor prank

Dear friends,

Although only five months young, dronologista blog has grown and needs a new attire.

As of 1st of September, dronologista.com moves to a new hosting, new address and slightly changes the appearance . Content will remain the same, and dronologista will continue to provide information about non-military drones only.

Enjoy!

And now something completely different. Previous drone startup posts featured ideas that are being actively pursued by visionaries around the world. Today’s post will be about Uber for drones, Gofor.

Imagine a drone service that provides drones on demand, when you need it, where you need it. Imagine an app for your iPhone or whatever smart device you have that will call that drone for you. That, in short, is what Gofor is. The only problem is that it actually doesn’t exist.

It is a brainchild of Alex Cornell, a San Francisco based graphic artist, drone enthusiast, known for his earlier, dystopian video ‘Our Drone Future’.

An experiment of designing and pitching a startup, created a veritable internet frenzy. The Youtube video at the beginning of this post has more than 30.000 views and numerous comments ranging from ‘love it <3’ to ‘welcome to NSA’. Since posting up a video and setting up the webpage, Alex Cornell got emails from Google and Texas Instruments employees, asking if he was hiring, that is how crazy it got.

Although Gofor is kind of April Foolsday jokes, it is not the sort of prank made to fool anyone. Technology isn’t nowhere near yet, but it is getting there. And it is quite possible that in a couple of years, possibly less, there will be a startup offering exactly the same service.

In the end, it would be useful to have a drone to find an empty parking spot for you.

 

 

Airworx

Dear friends,

Although only five months young, dronologista blog has grown and needs a new attire.

As of 1st of September, dronologista.com moves to a new hosting, new address and slightly changes the appearance . Content will remain the same, and dronologista will continue to provide information about non-military drones only.

Enjoy!

South Eastern Europe is not the place where most people would expect thriving UAV aerial filming environment. Yet it exists, and one of the first to adopt the new technology and offer a new perspective to its customers was Airworx from Novi Sad, Serbia.

Born out of love for RC models and mountain biking, the story of Airworx begins some three years ago, when Nikola, the owner, wanting to make better aerial shots, assembled his first quadcopter and attached a GoPro to it. What started as a way of getting better videos of freeride biking became a full blown aerial filming company.

Operating mainly in Serbia, Montenegro, Croatia and Hungary, these guys are responsible for some of the most stunning shots I’ve seen so far. Equipment behind those videos consists of octocopter with Microkopter electronics able to lift 2kg of payload, usually Sony CX730E, Blackmagic Pocket or Canon 5D mk2 and mk3 cameras. Also, there are two more TBS Discovery quadcopters equipped with GoPro Hero 3 cameras. Those small and nimble quads can be used to make shots from up to 3km distance, thanks to the FPV capabilities. Besides multirotors, Airworx also uses a Bormatec Maja fixed wing aircraft for terrain mapping.

What makes Nikola and his colleagues special is the fact that they are dedicated to make most out of their equipment and to use the full creative potential it has, keeping high safety standards at the same time. Although there are neither laws nor standards that cover use of commercial UAV in Serbia, Airworx uses its own, never flying its aircraft in urban environment above people, beyond visual line of sight and always up to 200m altitude.

Multirotors are a rare piece of machinery in the region, and that is why guys from Airworx plan to continue displaying all abilities of this tool in creating a unique visual identity. Ordinary stories can be presented in extraordinary ways and from unusual perspective using drones as an aerial filming platform.

For the end, here is a video Nikola is very proud of: wildlife shot made around the town of Novi Sad, Serbia. Small, running herd of roe deers was filmed beyond line of sight, in an open field using TBS Discovery quads.

 

Dronologista is quite sure that Airworx will go long way, and will be on lookout for their new videos, as should you.

Droneffiti

Dear friends,

Although only five months young, dronologista blog has grown and needs a new attire.

As of 1st of September, dronologista.com moves to a new hosting, new address and slightly changes the appearance . Content will remain the same, and dronologista will continue to provide information about non-military drones only.

Enjoy!

For a long time, unmanned aerial vehicle or drone has been associated exclusively with military operations. Remotely controlled instrument of war that brings death and destruction from above on its targets. Luckily, there are people who have different ideas on how to use drones. They can be utilized as a camera platform for breathtaking videos, for agricultural surveys, transport and most recently as an artistic tool.

Graffiti artist, vandal and a hacker KATSU has created series of paintings not made by hand, but, by an unmanned aerial vehicle aka drone, carrying a can of spray paint. Contemporary art gallery The Hole will present a series of abstract paintings by KATSU that are made by drone, on this weeks Silicon Valley Contemporary art fair.

This is the first time graffiti are made using semi controlled drone, and the paintings are very abstract. But the significance of the event surpasses the artistic value of paintings by far, because it represents a birth of a new art technique. In the years to come, I can foresee graffiti artists adopting it, adapting it, developing it, and happily vandalizing highrises that were out of their reach until now.

Droneffity masterpieces are coming, and dronologista welcomes them.

More info on and an interview with the artist, vandal and hacker KATSU on Motherboard and at Bard College’s Center for the Study of the Drone

The Hole’s booth at the exhibition in the gallery below:

The Hole Booth 1The Hole Booth 2The Hole Booth 4The Hole Booth 5The Hole Booth 6

Pictures are courtesy of The Hole Gallery and Ms Krysta Eder. Thank you!